I'm doing a cap replacement.

Discussion in 'Epiphone Guitars' started by AJ6stringsting, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. AJ6stringsting

    AJ6stringsting Active Member

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    A local electronics store went out of business ( sad ) , I managed to get some Orange Drop capacitors at 0.01 mf, 15 mf, 33mf and 47 mf
    Some are rated to 100 volts to 500 volts.
    Will the 100 volts rated caps sound different from the 500 volt caps ?
     
  2. Cozmik Cowboy

    Cozmik Cowboy Active Member

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  3. BGood

    BGood Well-Known Member

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    Nope
     
  4. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Nope. The values that matter is the capacitance value and (to me at least) the tolerance.

    The voltage rating is the top end of what you can put through it without frying it. A guitar circuit won't hit anywhere near that kind of voltage so there's no issue.

    http://tomsguitarprojects.blogspot.com/2014/12/electric-guitar-output-voltage-levels.html

    The main thing with the voltage rating is (usually) physical size. Bigger voltage rating typically means a bigger cap which can have it's own advantages and disadvantages depending on how you like to wire your stuff, but only from a space limitations perspective.

    I've been buying batches of caps lately to build up some stock and to get them at a bulk rate.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
  5. Cozmik Cowboy

    Cozmik Cowboy Active Member

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    Might I inquire as to the intended use? If (as it seems logical to assume, considering the venue in which you posit your query) you're talking about using them as guitar tone caps, you have the wrong values. The numbers are right, but mF denotes milliFarads, or 1000/00s of a Farad. The caps used in guitar tone circuits are measured in µF - microFarads, or 1,000,000/00s of a Farad.
     
  6. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    I'm hoping it was a typo. Typed "mf" meant "nf". If that's the case, he's good to go.

    EDIT: Ye Olde Capacitor Cheat Sheet
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
    Fullmoon 1971 and DigitalDreams like this.
  7. Davis Sharp

    Davis Sharp Well-Known Member

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    It's hard to find the µ (Alt+0181, Windows US). Some people type "uF, uL, etc." but that can be confusing. So can "MF." :)
     
  8. Cozmik Cowboy

    Cozmik Cowboy Active Member

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    Also, Word>Insert>Symbols>µ>Cut>Paste (yeah, a little more involved, but sometimes I don't feel like digging out my Alt+ cheat-sheet).
     
  9. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    I use uF as I have to copy-paste "µ" on the Kindle. Regardless, I'm still hoping it's an n vs m typo.
     
  10. Norton

    Norton Member

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    Spend some time on this YouTube channel.

    All the answers to all the wiring questions in real time. Easy to hear what’s worth doing and what’s not.
     
    Raiyn likes this.
  11. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    when-someone-finds-out-that-all-of-that-crazy-stuff-26428907.jpg

    Values and tolerance matter.
     
  12. Cozmik Cowboy

    Cozmik Cowboy Active Member

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    Preach it, brother!
     

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