A question for all those who have sanded the poly off their necks

Discussion in 'Epiphone Guitars' started by Stevo58, Jun 19, 2020.

  1. Stevo58

    Stevo58 Member

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    I have sanded the black poly off the neck of my 2017 QingDao Casino. It was quite a bit of work but well worth the effort.

    I had intended to oil the bare wood - but is it really bare wood?

    I have the feeling there is another thin poly clear coat under the black. Perhaps this is a filler. When I wet sand, I get the same sort of milky water I got while sanding through the clear coat - which turned dark grey when I hit the black.

    if there really is a clear coat, oiling won’t do much good and I can just leave it as is.

    Has anybody run into this?

    Steven
     
  2. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Usually folks around here just Scotchbrite their necks to cut the gloss. I wouldn't have ever considered what you've done to a formerly nice instrument.
     
  3. Stevo58

    Stevo58 Member

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    Ouch. Well, you know, I’ve been playing guitar for >50 years, and I have a nice collection of newer and vintage American made instruments. This is my only Asian instrument, and I bought it to experiment on. So I’m sorry that offends you, but I’m experimenting on it anyway. Maybe I’ll airbrush it like a 70s van.
     
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  4. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    I'm not offended, I just think you've made a mistake and ruined what could have been a good instrument for someone else. That is my opinion. How long you've been playing and what you own have no bearing on that.
    If want to airbrush it, might as well go right ahead, Gibson did 70's vans 2 years ago, but I suspect you're talking about dragons, rainbows, unicorns or something. How that turns out is based on artist skill.

    Typically around here the sacrificial lambs are Les Paul Special II's or perhaps a G310.
    A Casino is seen as something special by more than a couple people on the board. It isn't something that I'd be after as a rule, but I do recognize the significance of the model. Ultimately, what you do to your guitar is on you, but I don't know about the level of support you'll get.
     
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  5. Stevo58

    Stevo58 Member

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    Jesus Christ this is a mass produced Chinese guitar. It’s not a vintage treasure. Grow up.
     
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  6. soulman969

    soulman969 Active Member

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    Sorry but no. I've never tried to resurface a neck like you're doing.

    I've never had a problem with gloss necks although I do admit a satin finish feels better.
     
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  7. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    You seem offended. I offered my opinion, the fact that it differs from yours is of no concern to me.
     
  8. Rick Davey

    Rick Davey New Member

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    I'm new here, but I can't believe the way this conversation got personalized. We're just here to share some knowledge and mutual support, not to judge one another.

    Stevo, I've refinished a few necks over the years, Gibson and Fender, and never ran into what you described. I used OOOO steel wool and got right into the wood after the color.

    FWIW, I played Epiphones in the 60s when they were as good as the best guitars of that era, certainly equal to Gibson. Today's Epiphones are good value for the money, a good choice if that's the top of your budget, but let's stay real. They are budget copies of great guitars.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2020
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  9. Stevo58

    Stevo58 Member

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    So, here you can see the unspeakable damage I’ve done. In the first, the neck in toto.
    Photo 2, the drunken line at the neck joint. Finally, in photo 3 you can see the terrible work done on the side of the peghead. Awful. It’s a shame what I’ve done to a ‘formerly nice instrument.’ Which I view as a tool and nothing more.

    With this I have nothing more to say on this subject.
     

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  10. Norton

    Norton Active Member

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    That’s a perfect job. How did you get that line at the body so crisp???

    And yes Epiphone uses some insane sealer between wood and paint.

    I like stripped necks. Finished ones are fine too.
     
  11. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Salty much? I concede that you've done a nice job of it perhaps the best I've seen. Usually when some fng says they've sanded the neck it's some hack butcher job that only encompasses the playing area and looks like a a bucket of ass. Yours actually looks decent, I kinda wish you had led with the pictures.
     
  12. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Can't we all just get along?
    Some guys like bare necks, some guys like shiny metal tuners. Variety is the spice of life, no?
     
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  13. SGn339

    SGn339 New Member

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    Seriously Biddlin, this coming from you is laughable! Nice to see you still have your Forest Gump signature! Represent!
     
  14. SGn339

    SGn339 New Member

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    Thank you for the sermon almighty and all-knowing Raiyn! We are o-so-lucky to have your wisdom! :shock:

    It's his money, his guitar. What's the big deal? No need to be condescending. "I don't know about the level of support you'll get" don't worry about others bro!
     
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  15. Norton

    Norton Active Member

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    I just want to know how he got The lines so sharp!

    Then I want to try it.
     
  16. soulman969

    soulman969 Active Member

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    May God have mercy on your soul my brother. :rofl:

    Look pretty slick to me. Nice job......:thumb:
     
  17. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    I am the soul of inclusion, contrary to some folks' misconceptions.
     
  18. Stevo58

    Stevo58 Member

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    Thank you. I don’t do hack jobs. I thought about this quite a bit, considering how best to do it, before I began. I was surprised to find the undercoat - it is very definitely there - but it makes sense in the context of mass production. I’ll leave it. It’s not bare wood, but it feels fine and it protects the wood.

    I got the sharp lines with painter’s tape, a light touch, and patience. I started by wet sanding with 1200, knowing that was too fine, and worked my way up to 600, which was the right grit to remove the poly. Not the fastest, but the right one. One it was completely sanded, I wet sanded 800, 1000, and 1200, then dry sanded with mesh to 8000. This gives me a smooth, semi-gloss finish which feels good. The heel and the sides of the peghead were done very carefully, taping it off with blue tape, and using a small corner of paper.

    They filled a couple spots, one on the corner of the heel, another in the dove wing, and a third at the point where the peghead side and the taper meet. Nothing I can do about that. The dove wing is not symmetrical.

    I had planned on oiling this with tinted Tung oil to make it look more like the dark stained mahogany on vintage instruments, but the undercoat has put an end to that. I don’t necessarily think the light luan (I assume that’s what this is) looks good with the sunburst, but this isn’t about aesthetics.

    Sunburst was my last color choice, but this one had the stiffest, most stable neck of all I tried, so there you go. I would love to strip the body and lacquer it black but I don’t see how that is going to work out without professional equipment. I would have to sand deep to make sure there was no poly left. Very likely right through the top layer of laminate. And that WOULD be a hack job.

    I still have to do the bits on the side over the body. More fiddly bits.

    And I’m not a new guy. I just don’t post much.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
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  19. Norton

    Norton Active Member

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    so you got those crisp lines with top flight painters tape???

    and 600 was the most aggressive grit? wow.

    ok... I'll give that a shot on a broken neck/repair that would look better with the whole neck stripped back.

    and as far as refin's and epiphone finishes.... heat guns and careful scraping is the way to go. And even that leaves plenty of hard as diamonds sealer behind.

    nice work. love those casinos....modified or not.
     
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  20. Stevo58

    Stevo58 Member

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    Yeah 600, blue tape. Patience is a virtue.

    That sealer is something else. I experimented a bit and decided life was too short.

    I don’t want to mess with a heat gun on a bound body. I also wonder what would happen with the glue holding the lams together.
     
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