Gibson & Mesa-Boogie

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by Paruwi, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Only took them 63 years, completely gutting their catalog and turning them in to a vassal company making "lesser" licensed copies of Gibson designs, but yeah totally.
     
  2. grinwer

    grinwer Member

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    We will soon be reading the stories of how Mesa was created at Gibson. And many will believe it. I think Gibson is a big raider company. Lawsuits. Overpriced. Assignment. And nothing changes.
     
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  3. guitarlover

    guitarlover New Member

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    Did they really? I’ve never really had a problem with any Epis as to promote hatred towards their parent company, and lots of guys played em over the years. Jimi, George and John, Jazz guys, Neil Gallagher, many other rock and metal players...
     
  4. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Uh yeah, why do you think their primary models are all Gibson patterns?
    There is no hatred, only the statement of facts. I love my G400, which is a less expensive licensed copy of an Gibson SG.
    Epiphone was always the redheaded stepchild, there's no getting around that. Throwing out celebrity player names doesn't change the facts.

    I applaud the recent improvements to the Epiphone brand as a whole, and perhaps naively, believe that continuing to improve the brands already under the Gibby umbrella (Kramer particularly) would serve more of a purpose and be more fiscally responsible than going out and buying another company (incurring more debt not shielded by the 2018 bankruptcy) given the current market bubble.
     
  5. guitarlover

    guitarlover New Member

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    Lol “ red headed stepchild” is a fact? Thanks for the comic relief!

    I’m a guitarist, not a market analyst or what ever. I have an Epi LP going on 20 years old. It’s a great guitar. That’s a fact! To me anyway...

    I guess what I don’t really get is why are guitar forums often more full of Corporate analysis than musical, and people discussing guitars like cars?
     
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  6. Supersonic

    Supersonic Well-Known Member

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    *NOEL :D

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  7. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    You're one of those "make your own context" types huh?

    Nobody disputed that Epiphone makes great instruments. Your Epi LP is a less expensive licensed copy of a Gibson LP, one of several designs Epiphone was assigned to make after being purchased. Epiphone is and has been the lesser brand and has always been treated as such under Gibson rule.

    You don't have to be a market analyst to know that Gibson, under previous management, went bankrupt in 2018 because King Henry was buying up companies trying to become a luxe "lifestyle brand" or whatever.

    Fast forward to 2021, after months of increased sales caused by folks under C19 restrictions who were given stimulus checks (lumping myself in there too), Gibson decides that this is the time to go take on more debt. The fact that this time it's a brand complimentary to their core business, while more helpful than buying a home audio company, doesn't change my mind.

    It's a bad move. People are getting vaccinated, the restrictions will end, as will the checks.

    Fender, on the other hand, played it smart.
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/com...company-expects-record-2020-sales/ar-BB1beFyv

    • The coronavirus pandemic and national lockdowns spurred a much-needed revival of the guitar business.
    • Fender had been on track to post robust 2020 sales, but in March it had to idle its factories in the US and Mexico.
    • Unexpectedly, demand for guitars skyrocketed, and now CEO Andy Mooney figures this year could set a record for sales.

    Fender CEO Andy Mooney didn't mince words when he told Business Insider how bad he thought things could get when the coronavirus pandemic forced the company to shut down US and Mexico manufacturing operations in March.


    "We were looking over the edge of an abyss," he said.

    Fender has been around for over 70 years and has endured plenty of ups and downs. Mooney has been running the guitar-making icon — famous for its Stratocaster and Telecaster electric models, as well as a host of legendary amplifiers — since 2015, after stints at Nike and the Walt Disney Company.

    Under his leadership, the firm was enjoying an up period, until the beginning of 2020: 2019 sales amounted to $600 million and defied the notion that the guitar was in its death throes. "Through March, we were ahead of plan," he said.

    But the coronavirus wasn't in anybody's playbook.

    "We went thru furloughs and salary reductions," Mooney said. "We did everything to make sure we had enough cash."

    Then something unexpected happened: guitar sales took off. Fender now expects to post a record year in 2020, with $700 million.

    After feeling as though a "new comet" was hitting the business every day, Mooney recalled a shift in sentiment that arrived mid-year.

    "The orders started coming in," he said. "Dealers started to report that business was really good."

    [​IMG]© Fender Fender Play helped the company attract new customers. Fender
    It turns out that locked-down people with extra time on their hands had decided that wanted to learn how to play musical instruments.

    "We benefited more than most," Mooney noted, adding that his biggest concern was whether Fender would be able to make enough gear to satisfy demand through the end of 2020.

    Enhancing the company's success on the equipment side — in October, it launched its American Professional II Series of electric instruments, updating its flagship models — Fender has also pushed forward with its online-instruction offering, Fender Play.

    "Purely as a goodwill gesture, we asked ourselves, 'Why don't we offer Fender Play for free?'" Mooney said of the service, normally priced at about $10 per month to access a wide range of instructional videos and online learning tools.

    "We didn't think more than 100,000 would sign up. But that many signed up in the first week. It expanded to 500,000, so we went all-out, and now we have 980,000 people using the product."

    (Fender Play is still offering a free, three-month trial subscription.)

    "Fender Play brought a whole host of new consumers," Mooney said, pointing out that many were people who didn't know the brand, founded by Leo Fender in 1946. Of that group, 10% could become guitarists for life, he suggested. And if they buy the anticipated five-to-seven instruments over the lifetime, Mooney believes that activity could sustain the hardware business for years to come.

    "I would never characterize it as a good thing," he said of the challenges that the pandemic brought. "But it has changed our thinking about the future."

    Notice that they didn't go buying another company and seem pragmatic about the future.
     
  8. guitarlover

    guitarlover New Member

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    haha got me there nice pics!

    (I blame autocorrect!) lol...
     
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  9. guitarlover

    guitarlover New Member

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    Hey I appreciate the effort!

    But like I said, after a cursory analysis, which I’m really not all that motivated to “improve” or expand upon, I thought it was a good move to buy Mesa. Off the top of my head, my gut reaction was “oh cool!” Just my 2...

    Overall I’m really not that interested in Gibson or Fenders’ business practices, I just like to play guitar!

    Anyway I’m quite fond of inexpensive guitars and am glad that Gibson bought Epi back in the 50s, kept making guitars, and are still making them. Were would they be otherwise?

    And there’s so many crazy things going on right now, I can take some solace in Guitar things...

    BTW I have no idea what you mean by your question re. being a “make my own context” types.
     

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