identifying g-400

Discussion in 'Epiphone Guitars' started by imnotcreative, Dec 30, 2020.

  1. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    The old adage:"If it ain't broke..." is usually good advice with guitars. When put Gibson 57 classics in mine, I left the OEM pots and caps because they worked fine. I have never had rf interference with my G-400, but it does get "staticky" once in awhile. I use a dryer sheet to rub down the plastic and it goes away.
     
  2. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    ill give it a try and see how it turns out.
     
  3. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    I was running a lot of CFL's at the time in a house built in 1940 with a lot of original cloth wiring. It did help with the buzz. It wasn't as dramatic as with the single coils, but I noticed the improvement. Plus it was cheap and easy to do while I was in there doing everything else.
    I find myself encouraging folks to do the same more often lately. Lately I've only changed pots and caps if I wanted different values or to replace dime sized pots (which I know are generally fine) for someone else. If they wanna buy parts, it's fine by me.
     
  4. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    you're right about that. still i think ill remove the burrs eventhough it gets covered up. it just triggers my ocd.
    i understand some shortcuts have to be made to build the guitars within a certain pricerange. it's a good thing i dont work at a guitar factory milling out the cavities all day.. i want to feel some pride in my work and try to make it as perfect as possible.. they would probably fire me for nitpicking and taking to long, or maybe put me in the line for higher end guitars.
    i do work in a factory and have been told by my superiors they appreciate my will to do a perfect job but i dont work in quality control so i should be less nitpicky because we'd be out of business if all workers were as strict as i am.
     
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  5. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    For the last 18 years of my work life, I worked in Hazmat and bio-haz abatement and containment for a large Western city. I also trained and helped certify others. OCD was a job requirement, especially after 9/11. At the same time, I was working in a club band and doing guitar repair. My best friend and bass player gave me a plaque that still hangs in my music room:
    "Perfection is often the enemy of Good."
     
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  6. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    we make closures for metal drum barrels mostly used in oil and chemical industries. therefor some of the tolerances are quite strict (about 0.3mm maximum) and i sometimes work on the printing press printing the customers logo on tin sheet, which also has to be quite precise so the colours and lines match up aswell as the cropmarks for the cutting to eventually make the tab seal.
    your job sounds a bit too stressful for me to be honest. id imagine it takes a special kind of person to deal with such stress and still being able to adhere to some strict rules and regulations without losing overview of the situation and keeping calm and dealing with the subject at hand. i'd reckon there would be a time constraint aswell in case of an accident. i don't know if i would be able to handle those situations.
    "Perfection is often the enemy of Good." that is a very true saying. in many cases it does not make much difference so it's a bit futile to try and do better especially when there is a lot of money involved.
    one thing i was always taught ''there is no such thing as perfection, there is always room for improvement''
     
  7. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Copper-pups (1).jpg
    vs
    [​IMG]
    isn't even a contest. I was shocked to see the state of the floor of the cavity of the Doheny. However, I wasn't in the headspace to do anything about it at the time. I had a list of wants for this guitar and a desire to complete everything in a reasonable amount of time. There was a brief moment of "get the Dremel", but I'm no Norm Arbram so that could've ended very badly. As I said earlier, my more immediate concern is the area under the pickup foam, but even that will wait at least until my next string change or (more likely) my next clean and polish job. It's something I need to take my time with without distraction.

    norm-abram-he-aint.jpg
     
  8. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    if you really want things to be as perfect as can be you'll be busy for a very long time im sure.. and in the mean time i reckon you also want to play it.. you can get there eventually bit by bit.
    since mine was really dirty and not in a very good shape i took it all apart.. i was able to get the burrs out in the bridge cavity with an exacto knife. so far ive spent well over 3 hours just cleaning and oiling the tuners.about 2 hours cleaning polishing and oiling the bridge and saddle. nearly an hour just cleaning the plastics.. there are some miniscule surface scratches on the plastic parts id like to buff them out but i dont think ill do that simply because i dont have the confidence in doing a good job. i have tried polishing a painted surface before and it didnt turn out that well.. i have checked the leveling of the frets. and spent about 3 hours slowly polishing the frets a bit (with the fretboard taped off) with 2000 grit polishing paper to get some minor dents and scratches out, continually checking the leveling as not to go too deep. not all will be polished out because im afraid ill end up going to far and having to get it refretted. i also spent about an hour just cleaning the entire body with a moist microfibre cloth and some mild handsoap. its unbelievable how dirty those cloths have gotten. now i still have to do the pots, toggle switch and output jack. i also tried the sharpie and superglue to ''fix'' the nicks, but my sharpie is far too bright in colour and my superglue was way too thick to be applied properly so ill have to get some new ones when the shops open up again.
    this weekend whilst enjoying some whiskey being on the internet late at night i ended up ordering a set of seymour duncan sh-1 59 humbuckers... i guess i'll be putting those in now, just have to wait to get them in.
     
  9. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    i've finished cleaning my guitar and it looks a lot better. photo's don't really do it justice though, especially after reducing image size so i can share them here.
    the body and neck have a bit of a shiny gloss to them now. i polished every screw (some were rusty) and nut. took out all wiring and cleaned the pots and resoldered everything. the tuners are nice and shiny again and after a bit of oil work real smooth. it also sounds a lot better now without any crackles. i also filled in all holes where i once placed the strap nuts with toothpicks and glue, coloured it with a sharpie and then filled them up with glue. i wasnt able to perfectly match the body colour. there is some dust again because i live in a very dusty house wich is a constant problem.
    i am still waiting for the seymour duncan 59's to come in the mail along with some new strings. i''ve ordered them from Germany, which normally takes about 2 days.. but at the moment it's about 2 weeks, probably because of covid. IMG_20210109_130214.jpg IMG_20210109_130239.jpg IMG_20210109_130320.jpg IMG_20210109_130427.jpg IMG_20210109_130454.jpg IMG_20210109_130517.jpg IMG_20210109_184309.jpg IMG_20210109_184013.jpg
     
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  10. BGood

    BGood Well-Known Member

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    NICE JOB! Looks great.

    For the tooth pick plugged holes, you would have had to smudged the area several times between glue coats. If you can fin and orange Sharpie, they tend to be dark, almost brownish, I guess it could help.

    The shine is just perfect, doesn't seem too glossy. When you restring, try top wrapping the tail piece. I find it makes bends a tad easier, but I mostly do it for the looks and also lesser downward pressure on the bridge. A bridge can eventually collapse if the tail piece is decked.

    bridge.jpg

    I just sold my dark brown one this morning. A beauty it was.

    IMGP1226_tonemapped.jpg

    Still have the Cherry Red, that one isn't going anywhere ever.
     
  11. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    i can still try that with the orange sharpie. i havent filled the holes completely yet because of the colour difference and my super glue is a bit too thick to make it really smooth. the only problem is that all shops are closed aside from supermarkets because of the lockdown over here. i probably could find it online but i prefer going to the bookstore and check which colours they have and see which matches closest. but that will have to wait a bit. i dont have to take it all apart again so i can easily do that in the future.

    ill try top wrapping the strings and see if i like it when they come in.
    the body really cleaned up well. i first used loads of moist cleaning towels impregnated with mild detergent. then ispropyl alcohol and then gave it another wipe with the cleaning towels. to finish it off i used some white mineral oil let that set for about 5 minutes and then spend some time wiping that off. same with the neck and fretboard. the mineral oil really makes the grain in the fretboard come out and the pearloid inlays really shine and dance in the light. unfortunately it doesnt really show well on photo's

    it sure looked good. i hope the buyer is really going to enjoy it
     
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  12. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't bother with the top wrap since you seem the type to concern yourself with scratches. The tailpiece is designed to be raised and lowered and you can accomplish the same thing just by adjusting the tailpiece. It doesn't have to be decked - if it was meant to be that way they wouldn't have bothered making it adjustable in the first place.
    You can have it as low as you want as long as you can fit a piece of paper between the bridge and the strings on the back side towards the tailpiece you're fine. As for going up, you'll know when you've gone too far.

    In regards to the bridge collapsing... they're replaceable - again by design. It's also an Epiphone copy of a Gibson which means it's not a Gibson so don't worry about originality or whatever collectors care about. Play the **** out of it.
     
  13. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    i know the tailpiece is designed to be raised, however i'm not sure what the effect would be on the holes with the nut inserts. there will be a lot more stress on the bolts and nuts and holes because basically you're pulling them a bit forward when you raise them. in my experience with furniture eventually the holes get slightly wider and the nut insert falls out. i was thinking i could also get a replacement bridge and put it on there and store the original. they are not as expensive and at this moment in time i have some spare money left. on the other hand.. this bridge is 18 years old and has always been set up like this with strings over it and it still hasnt collapsed. i use light strings aswell 08/38 which also puts less tension on the guitar.
    and if i do want to try topwrapping i could put some tape over it to prevent scratching or maybe a small piece of cloth.
    but tomorrow i will first install the seymour duncan 59's and then the new strings. they finally got in the mail today
    and then practice again. it has been a good while so i'm a bit rusty at the moment. and then play the **** out of it

    i also acquired something else today, but i'll have to post that in the ''show your other guitars'' thread
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2021
  14. BGood

    BGood Well-Known Member

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    The strings don't move, they rest on the tailpiece, so no wear to speak of. And if you decide that topwrapping is finally your thing, you don't care if they scratch the tailpiece, strings will always hide it.
     
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  15. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    i guess you're right about that. i'm not sure if i will topwrap, but i am considering it.
    the bridge has held up for 18 years now though without problems, it still has it's curve and i use lightweight strings which might also put less pressure on the bridge. i am considering buying a second bridge just to preserve the original one. the original pickups will be stored in the foam padded plastic case that came with the seymour duncan's. just in case i ever want it back to original in (most) perfect condition.
     
  16. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Negligible. The bushings go the full depth of the hole. Again this is the engineered design that goes all the way back to the mid fifties, obviously if it was an issue they'd have changed it. If there was a defect in the wood perhaps, but you'd have seen something by now. Also nobody is saying jack it to the moon, it only needs to be high enough for the strings not to foul on the back of the bridge. If you can slip a piece of paper under the strings on the back side you're good that's as high as you need it to be.

    You're joking right? It's an Epiphone G400 not a '61 Gibson Les Paul (as the SG was known then) there is no financial, historical, or rational incentive to keeping everything original and pristine - also that ship sailed a long time ago on your guitar. Stop freaking out about making it perfect or whatever and just play the thing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2021
  17. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    i'll give it a try raising them. i'll turn them up slightly and see what happens.

    i know it's not a gibson, but eventhough i've neglected it for some time there still is some special meaning behind it to me.. my father bought it for me not too long before his passing. therefor whatever i can still preserve and keep original i would like to keep that way. it's one of the few things i have left and id like to preserve as much as i can.
    since yesterday i now also own a gibson les paul bfg which i will for sure play the shit out off. i don't care about the gibson's originality. i am already thinking of rewiring that thing to get rid of the killswitch, put the pickup switch there as on all others and adding an extra tone knob. and maybe some different humbuckers but i would have to route the p90 socket for that or get a mini humbucker
     
  18. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    My G400 was the last project I consulted my father on, so I can see where you're coming from. That said, if you were to improve the instrument and make it something you want to play, the music would be more monument than preserving an admittedly inexpensive factory wear item part.
    I'm proud of the work I did on my G400 and I'm glad for the memories of picking my father's brain during the project. I miss the man deeply but maintaining the playability of my axe is of far greater importance than preserving the whole thing in amber.
     
  19. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative New Member

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    i guess you're right on that. for now i've upgraded the humbuckers for seymour duncan 59's which sound much clearer than the stock epiphone's which sounded a little muddy, other than that it plays and sounds great. i have moved the stopbar up a bit to relief some tension from the bridge. what you said about being able to slide a piece of paper between the bridge and strings isn't a problem, even with the stopbar all the way down i still had about half a millimeter of space in between. i've been practicing everyday for about an hour and my hands are still a bit rusty from not playing for so long, but it's slowly coming all back to me.
    now it's time to look for a better amp than the horrible bc rich practice amp i have. i prefer a tube amp but i don't feel like spending over €400 at the moment just yet. preferably i would like to hear the amp before buying, but i can't just walk in to a shop at the moment because of lockdown and youtube video's don't do the sound justice with all the compression. i did try it on a friends fender blackface which sounded amazing. a tad bit expensive to get one of those though..
     
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  20. BGood

    BGood Well-Known Member

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    Can't beat a P90 at the neck on a LP. Leave it there, but lower it as much as possible to find its sweet spot. On some LPs it's almost buried. You'll learn to love it.

    les-paul-gold-top-p-90-neck.jpg

    About adding a 4th pot, do you really use them or it's for the looks ?
     

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