Maxed out truss rod on Les Paul 100. Replace the neck or return the guitar?

syco

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Turning towards D A E (low) strings will cause upbow . Turning towards G B E (high) will in induce relief ( underbow ) Don't make drastic turns . 1/8 - 1/4 at a time . Let it sit ( 30 minutes ) between each adjustment .
 

PorkRinds

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Turning towards D A E (low) strings will cause upbow . Turning towards G B E (high) will in induce relief ( underbow ) Don't make drastic turns . 1/8 - 1/4 at a time . Let it sit ( 30 minutes ) between each adjustment .
C19015D9-BA10-4DDC-880C-017CA459C9C5.png
The guitar had too much relief when I first got it, like in the third picture here. I got it straighter after turning the truss rod towards the lower strings. I did 1/8 turns and let it sit every time. The neck is still not completely straight, so I went to turn the truss rod again but it’s seized; it won’t turn any further.
 

syco

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The guitar had too much relief when I first got it, like in the third picture here. I got it straighter after turning the truss rod towards the lower strings. I did 1/8 turns and let it sit every time. The neck is still not completely straight, so I went to turn the truss rod again but it’s seized; it won’t turn any further.
It's not seized . It's maxed out . Either learn to live with it , return it , or get another neck , which could possibly have same problem .
 
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Depending on how much it is upbowed, you could try to go to smaller strings, I guess. The lower tension of the bigger strings may help straighten out the strings to the point where it is acceptable.

The other thing is you may want to talk to a luthier about heat pressing the neck, which involves loosening the truss rod, and putting the neck in a jig that both heats the neck and applies pressure where required to straighten out the neck. This works on all necks, even the solid maple necks that don't have separate fingerboards, but it works best on necks with fingerboards. The most common usage is on necks that don't have truss rods (either never had a truss rod, or have a non-adjustable truss rod, as in older Martin acoustic guitars). If you want to keep costs to a minimum, or don't have a good local luthier, sending the guitar back may be your best bet.

P.S. The diagram was a little messed up. It is showing neck angle changes vs. real relief changes, and in that way is a little mis-leading.
 

syco

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The other thing is you may want to talk to a luthier about heat pressing the neck, which involves loosening the truss rod, and putting the neck in a jig that both heats the neck and applies pressure where required to straighten out the neck.
I did that on my own and people here thought I was nutz !!!!!!!
 

Noodling Guitars

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I did that on my own and people here thought I was nutz !!!!!!!
lol I thought you benchpressed the neck sans heat tho :rofl:

the heat press/neck iron is actually very involved - it's also a very expensive process. While it's an option, it's definitely not economical esp since the whole guitar was only $160... It's expensive because of the time involved (it's usually not a one step process - and does involve some luck).
 

syco

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lol I thought you benchpressed the neck sans heat tho :rofl:

the heat press/neck iron is actually very involved - it's also a very expensive process. While it's an option, it's definitely not economical esp since the whole guitar was only $160... It's expensive because of the time involved (it's usually not a one step process - and does involve some luck).
When I do it ..... which has been twice so far . I do a day out in the sun ( sometimes gets 110 F ) and a day indoors . I will state I did not do it for trying to straighten a neck , but as an experiment into seeing if it would relieve some of the tightness in the neck . I do 60 lbs of weight .
 
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Heat pressing a neck usually has higher temperatures than 110F. It also uses U bolts and various spacers to get the neck properly straightened (because not all necks need the same pressure, at the same points, in order to straighten out. It can take weeks, depending on the amount of straightening required, and the stiffness of the neck (wood and any truss rods). It can be expensive, but it is also dependent on the luthier. Its more of a put it in the heat press for a couple of days, check the neck, put it back into the heat press, adjust the spacers and U bolts based on what is happening with the neck, and repeat as many times as necessary. As Noodling Guitars has pointed out, it isn't always successful, but does work sometimes. In the cases it doesn't work, the guitar neck's wood has taken some sort of set that just can't be worked out of it by heat and pressure. In those cases, it may look OK for a short period of time,then the neck goes back into the same state that it was before the heat pressing was performed.

In the end with a guitar this inexpensive, it is probably best to send it back and get a refund.
 
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syco

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In the end with a guitar this inexpensive, it is probably best to send it back and get a refund.
And where is the fun in that . Cheap guitars are the best to learn / experiment on . I honestly don't think there is anyone even remotely considered a "Luthier " within 4 or 5 hours of where I live and that's being optimistic . I'm a redneck / hillbilly or whatever term you wish to use . I drive 20 miles for basic goods . I grew up making do with what you had . If you drove 50 miles and got a load lumber , 99% of time when you got to the last few pieces , they were bowed . Do you drive 100 miles roundtrip to exchange them ? Nope ! Get several cinder blocks . Place each end of board on cinder blocks , stack some cinder blocks in the middle of board and let sit for a while . I'll be damned !!!!!! That took the bow out .

Did I have a point to this story ? NOPE !!! Just waiting on oil to soak into fretboard and was bored . Pun intended . Have a most glorious day !
 
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Your guitar, do what you want. I was just pointing out that with a $160 guitar, getting the neck properly heat pressed (without a 100% guarantee of success) for more than the price of the guitar, or even buying (or making for that matter) a neck heat press is probably not cost effective, and you did say you had the option of returning the guitar. If this is a learning experience for you, or you want to get the tooling to do stuff like this in the future, more power to you. Just remember, you are looking at something more than the value of the guitar to get this done properly.
 

28 Flathead

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Your guitar, do what you want. I was just pointing out that with a $160 guitar, getting the neck properly heat pressed (without a 100% guarantee of success) for more than the price of the guitar, or even buying (or making for that matter) a neck heat press is probably not cost effective, and you did say you had the option of returning the guitar. If this is a learning experience for you, or you want to get the tooling to do stuff like this in the future, more power to you. Just remember, you are looking at something more than the value of the guitar to get this done properly.
I'm sure what your saying is true, but there are many complicated procedures that can be broken down to their basic principals and be used effectively. Perhaps not as effectively as a professional job with all the proper tools etc.. but maybe just effectivly enough to get the job done.
@syco was just saying that he did it himself and everyone here thought it was nutz, it's obvious that includes you. You seem to have a dispute with @syco "Your guitar, do what you want." when the OP is @PorkRinds, it's his guitar.

Further, in post #24 you are the one who says "The other thing is you may want to talk to a luthier about heat pressing the neck,"
You seem to be contradicting yourself.
 
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Sorry you feel that you need to defend syco or PorkRinds. My point was a general one not specifically any one person, in that there are a number of ways to address this. As stated, heat pressing the neck by a luthier is one way, buying the equipment to heat press a neck is another. Either case is not cost effective. If syco wants to have it done by a luthier, fine, if he wants to "have fun" and buy the equipment to learn how to do it himself, that too is fine. If he wants to just try to hang a weight off the end of the headstock without heat being applied, for a couple of days, weeks, years, decades, whatever period of time, that too is fine, in both Syco and PorkRinds cases. If they want to take a jigsaw and cut the neck where it bends, and add a wedge to straighten it out, that too is fine. As stated before, its your guitar, do what you want, I was only presenting the way it is commonly approached. However, aside from the case where the weight is hung off the headstock without heat, the value of the guitar, as paid for by PorkRinds, will not be cost effective on a guitar that originally cost $160, and he has the option of returning it, and it holds no sentimental value as it is a recent purchase. In either case, a luthier performed heat pressing, or buying the equipment, the cost of the heat press will exceed the value of the guitar ($160).

I never said that what Syco did was nuts,nor have I seen anybody say that it was nuts, but that I didn't understand what he was trying to do. He wanted to learn by doing, on his guitar; he is free to do as he pleases. Again, the famous "your guitar, do what you want" . I also pointed out that 110F is not, in my mind at least, hot enough to get the job done in one day. If I am wrong, then I am wrong. Please feel free to correct me so that I can be better informed going forward and not continue to make incorrect statements. Do keep in mind, however, most luthier tools exist to fill a need, neck heat presses included. If there was another effective way to straighten out a neck, there would not have been neck heating presses invented, or at least, would not have been made as a pretty standard luthier tool.

Syco, nor PorkRInds didn't have any issue with the posts that I made, at the very least, they didn't post anything telling me to shut up, like you just did. Care to elaborate on why you felt that you had to?

Sorry for trying to point out the options to PorkRind and discuss the topic Syco, how rude of me.
 
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