Neck joint question

Discussion in 'Epiphone Guitars' started by Noodling Guitars, Oct 24, 2021.

  1. Noodling Guitars

    Noodling Guitars Member

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    So I've been digging out my older guitars and got around to cleaning up a Joe Bonamassa gold top over the weekend. One thing I noticed was that the bridge height was much lower than other Epis or Gibsons made around the same few years. Was there any reason why the neck joint was particularly lower for this model? There's absolutely nothing wrong with it, it's properly setup and plays great. Just curious why they changed the geometry for this guitar in particular as I thought Epi would use the same routing program for the bodies. Was this a particular selling point at the time? (I'm not familiar with Bonamassa's stuff or preferences etc..., but did watch a few youtube videos from back in the day when he was promoting this model).
     
  2. imnotcreative

    imnotcreative Active Member

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    Could probably have something to do with the accepted tolerance of the neck angle during manufacuring. Which is my number 1 suspect. Or maybe the carve on the body goes up slightly higher compared to others. On my G400 the bridge is almost flush with the body because it hardly has any angle in the neck/body joint, whereas on my other guitars the angle is slightly larger therefor needing to put the bridge a bit higher to clear the frets and fretboard. as long as the bridge itself can be adjusted to proper height for playing with a slight bit of travel in either direction for possible future setup it should be fine as far as i know. The geometric relationship between the nut, strings, bridge and frets is what's important
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2021
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  3. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Everything is cut using CNC, but the necks are still glued in by hand - there will be variations.
    Yup, bridge height has been discussed a fair few times here and that's the gist of it right there.
    Decked.jpg
    That's probably as low as a guy would ever want his bridge.
    :cheers:
     
  4. Noodling Guitars

    Noodling Guitars Member

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    Ah yes, that's very low! But if the geometry works then it's all good. Is that a G400? Were they generally that way?
     
  5. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    It is a G400, and no, mine seems to be on the lower end of the spectrum. The Tune-o-matic system was made to be adjustable to accommodate for manufacturing irregularities.
     
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  6. Noodling Guitars

    Noodling Guitars Member

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    I guess we both got lucky:rofl: I remember there was this arcane video of Joe Walsh trying to say how this was supposed to be better... *facepalm*

    20211027_015001.jpg
     
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  7. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Woof! Thankfully yours works. To get that slightly taller roller bridge to work on mine we popped the bushings out and removed the shoulders so we could recess them otherwise I'd have had about an eighth of a turn tops before bottoming out. Stock, I want to say was closer to what I'm seeing on yours.

    You do have a very nice break angle to the stopbar though. No issues there. As long as you can slip a normal piece of copy / printer paper in between the back of the bridge and the string, you're golden. Either that, or the strings will hit and "self-clearance" themselves. In that case, decked ain't the way to go.
     

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