NPD: Keeley Compressor +

Discussion in 'Tone Zone' started by Space1999, Jul 15, 2021.

  1. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    IMG_1204.jpeg
    New Pedal Day :D

    I saw the Keeley Compressor + being advertised and I read up on it.
    The website said that the compressor had a switch for single coil pus and one for humbuckers. And explained why you need a different circuit for either one.

    The explanation described exactly what I was hearing through my Wampler Ego. Just this dragging effect that was smearing my mid lows in my tone.

    So I pulled the trigger and installed it in my pedal board and the Compressor + was actually even better than I expected. I was fast and responsive and didn’t muddy up my guitar tone.

    It also doesn’t have a bad setting on the pedal which is a lot like some of my favorite analog outboard and plugins like a Neve 1073 or Trident A channel.
    It has a switch for single coil or humbucker, though I have not tested the single coil side of the pedal as I only have one guitar with P-90’s.

    Just thought I would share my experience.

    Pat
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2021
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  2. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    IMHO it's one of the best compressors available. :thumb:
     
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  3. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    I had a thought that the Wampler Ego comp could be a good comp for my bass while tracking.

    What do you think? I have a Hofner 500/8 Very Thin long scale bass with tape wounds and the low end is boundless on that monster!

    IMG_1210.jpeg

    Pat
     
  4. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    I use the TC HyperGravity multi-band compressor for my guitar rig and my TC RH750 bass head has the SpectraComp bass version of that same compressor onboard.

    I'm also a huge fan of Wampler pedals but be aware that the Ego is not specifically designed for bass frequencies and isn't a multi-band compressor whereas the SpectraComp is.

    It's also half the price of the Ego. I might suggest trying the SpectraComp first and if you aren't pleased with it simply exchange it for the Ego. Virtually every dealer offers a 30 or 45 day exchange privilege.

    That's a gorgeous bass too. Beautiful finish. Is the body maple?
     
  5. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    I just Jack my bass into my Apollo Twin and I have plenty of compression and multi-band compression available.

    You are right though, the Wanpler would probably kill the low end. Maybe I will run an amp and a DI next time I record.

    Compress the mids going through a small bass amp with no lows to avoid phase problems.

    Then work with it in Logic.

    Yes the Hofner Very Thin long scale is all Flame maple for the body, spruce block and a maple/beech/maple neck.

    It has massive lows with a bark in the mids if you play back on the strings that sounds very Entwistle.

    it’s only 1.25” wide.

    https://www.hofner-guitars.com/verythin-ct-long-scale-bass.html

    Pat
     
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  6. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    With the kind of "horsepower" you have available with your interface and other recording tools I would think they could handle any need you have for bass compression.

    My suggestion was based more on live performance which is where I've spent most of my days. When I've recorded either the engineer used his studio compressor or he handed me one to use he preferred over my amps compressor, but that was long ago.

    IME onboard or pedal bass compressors are fairly simple units that only provide the user with a single knob to set their level. Where the TC model varies is in it's multi-band compression much like their rack mount studio compressors.

    One other thing I also favor in the TC products I've used is their transparency but the Keeley lacks nothing in that regard either. For me it would be in every way equal to the HyperGravity and I'd be just as happy with it.
     
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  7. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    I am going to scout around for the HyperGravity and check it out. You really seem to be pleased with it. I have never seen a multi-band comp in a pedal form come to think of it.

    Totally makes sense for bass. More so than just a straight comp.
    Thanks for turning me on to that pedal.

    I can never have too many pedals. :rofl:

    Edit: Wow I checked the HyperGravity out and it runs the MD3 comp from the System 6000. That is a very big deal! The 6000 changed everything in the studio and were ridiculously expensive when they came out.
    Nice that TC is sharing parts of that tech.

    Pat
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2021
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  8. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    TC has always been an innovative company and IME have produced some very good pedals that are based on their high end studio gear. Their Helicon Series acoustic and vocal processors are another example of that and I love their bass gear. They've separated themselves by taking a somewhat "old school" approach to the tonality of their SS amps which I generally prefer to more modern sounding amps. Tonally they're intentionally very much like an Ampeg.

    I've been using one of their Booster + Line Driver/Distortion pedals as a clean boost for my guitars for over 30 years and I use a mini Spark Boost with my passive basses. They're the most transparent ones I've ever played and the Booster + Line Driver/Distortion also has a two band EQ and a noise gate.

    It really helps when pushing up the output of my single coil pickups and it's also a very good OD/Distortion pedal. It feel it gives me more presence and allows me to use the volume pots on my guitars and basses more effectively so it's typically and always on effect. I use or have used quite a few TC pedals.

    I just wish they had not sold out to Behringer. TC's customer service used to be top shelf and now it's virtually non-existent. It's all done via Music Tribe now where it's buried along with other product lines Behringer owns and poorly staffed with people who lack the technical knowledge needed for their jobs.

    Here's a pic of the Booster + Line Driver Distortion I'm using.

    tc pedal.JPG
     
  9. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    That is a very cool boost. I am using a J. Rockett Blue Note for a boost and it has been one of the best pedals I have bought.

    Yes I looked up your amp head when I was on Reverb because I did not know that TC made a bass amp and that it had a massive wattage output.

    I couldn’t believe how compact it was! And it had all the right ins and outs with a LCD tuner on the front. Awesome.

    I am definitely an Ampeg fan. I would love to have a VT-22 someday. I use the Ampeg SVT head and 8-10” cab UAD plugin a lot of times for my guitar rig since my sound is in my board.

    Thanks for turning me on to all of this. What kind of bass do you play now and what cabinet does the TC head feed?

    Pat
     
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  10. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    While we're talking about TC innovation that RH750 bass head and it's RH450 little brother are great examples. When gear magazine evaluated both they discovered that both amps used a power module that produces just 240w.

    Many of the guys on TalkBass were in love with these amps 'til that info was published. Then it became TC lied to us and we're getting ripped off. TC explained their technology but many weren't buying it or misinterpreted it.

    TC uses a form of a filter/limiter to eliminate the excess wattage needed to produce sub audible frequencies that require all of that excess wattage so all of the wattage is available to reproduce what's usable not what's unusable.

    The result is an amp that every bit as loud and dynamic as a 750w or 450w head and that was proven in tests as well as by the testimony of it's users but for the purists that was no excuse and new sales fell off immediately after that.

    That's shame because the heads and their features including the tuner, the 4 band tone stack and it's versatility, the effects loop and DI, and the onboard SpectraComp compressor make it an incredible value and a great sounding amp.

    Unlike many other manufacturers they sought to separate themselves by using a more traditional old school native voicing so it's very much like the old Ampeg tube heads tonally. That what attracted me to the BG250-115 combo I had to begin with and also why I wanted the RH750 when I went with head/cab setup.

    I have two Epifani cabs. One is an older 1x12 cab with a ceramic speaker and the other is a 2x12 UL 2 with Neo speakers. They're both 4 ohm cabs and the TC head won't run both simultaneously @ 2.67 ohms so I also have a Carvin BX500 head that can operate at 2 ohms. That's another great head IMHO.

    I have three basses. A G&L Kiloton, a G&L M2000, and a Matt Freeman PBass I've modified with a Bill/Becky Lawrence/Wilde P46 pickup, a Babicz FCH Bridge, and a set up LaBella Deep Talkin' Flats. That's my Motown/Memphis Stax blues and soul machine. Best PBass I've ever owned. Great neck profile too.

    I really enjoy the G&Ls too. IMHO they're one of the best values available. The Kiloton is a very aggressive mid focused bass that can cut through anything and the M2000 is an 18v active version of their popular L2000. It's by far the most versatile of the three and gives me something like a JBass on steroids.

    I've been through a whole lot of basses and bass rigs over the 50 + years I've played and I have to say I'm more satisfied with what I have now than anything I've had in the past. I only wish I still had some of that older vintage gear now because of what it would be worth if I sold it but back in the '60s who knew. :dunno:
     
  11. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    In my own experience a really good clean boost is one of the best investments any guitarist can make. The difference in my sound with that TC pedal engaged vs off is pretty incredible especially with my single coil pickups and P90s.

    I'm far more a bassist than a guitarist where I'm more a rhythm and riff guy than the hot soloist so I'm playing clean a lot or just on the edge of break up and more typically use my pedals for more dirt or crunch when I need it.

    So that TC Booster+Distortion really comes in handy if all I want to take to a jam is just my tuner, my compressor, and that. If I absolutely need more break up from an amp I just kick up it's volume/gain or I can switch it over to it's distortion side where it can go from a very mild edge all the way to near fuzz like distortion and sustain. It's one pedal I will never sell or gig without.
     
  12. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    I guess TC is abandoning the RH line. The were only two new RH750’ listed on Reverb and they were “box opened once” deals and were being sold in Germany.

    There was only 3 used heads and they were also “box opened once deals”, telling me these were just returned heads after the debacle you mentioned.

    I am a big Rolling Stones fan from ‘69 to when Mick Taylor left and especially love the various Ampeg amps they used during that period.

    I would have loved to hear guitar through that RH750 since you said it was modeled off of the vintage Ampeg designs and my sound is in my pedalboard.

    I am also with you on how you approach gain staging. It is everything when you are chasing tone. And heaven lives in the in between the shades of clean and breakup and breakup and distortion. :naughty:

    Pat
     
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  13. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    Although they still list them on their site I believe they may have abandoned them awhile ago (or at least most dealers have) in favor of the less costly BH heads and the Blacksmith which is a 1600w version with RH series features.

    You can still find a few new ones in dealer inventories but most I've seen listed are used, open box, or B-stock. I bought mine used from a very good friend as well. They first came out about 10-12 years ago so they did have a good run.

    I never played any of my guitars through the RH750 but that's not to say with as much range as the EQ provides it couldn't be used for guitar. But overall I probably just stick with the old Ampeg tube heads like a legendary 100w V-4B.

    For the blues, r&b, and roots rock kinda stuff I play now I don't really need or use much distortion so I'm more averse to higher gain stuff although what I have in OD pedals are surely capable of it as are my amps. I do play clean a lot too.
     
  14. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    I did read about the Blacksmith. I have long wanted a VT-22 for guitar but they are around a $1000 in various states of disrepair.
    I wouldn’t want the headache or the backache of a vintage VT-22 but man I would love to have a modern clone that wasn’t 100 pounds!

    I meant to ask you about using a felt mute. Since you have been playing ever since the 60’s you must have come in contact with the old P-Basses and the Rickenbacker bass’ that had the adjustable felt mute.

    Did you ever use them and if so what is your opinion of them?
    I am tracking a new song that I feel would benefit from more of a staccato attack and all I have is some foam blocks that I use on some guitars with a long string loom to keep them from resonating in concert with the guitar.

    I know I can palm mute but I have read positive things about the felt mutes. What do you think about them?

    Thanks,

    Pat
     
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  15. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    Never owned a "Ricky". I don't like them. And since I've typically used flats on my PBasses ever since day one there never seemed to be a need for a mute. So I have never used felt for a mute but I do use a foam pad under the strings of my G&L Kiloton at times and I've also used it on some Jazz Basses.

    I use the foam piece that typically goes under the pickups of a Jazz Bass to raise them. It's a perfect fit for the flat ledge on the base plate just ahead of the saddles. It tones ringing down a bit when I use a pick and doesn't have all that much impact when I'm playing finger style. Plus it's very easy to remove when I don't need it. I'll also palm mute at times when that's needed.

    When Carol Kaye was recording with the Wrecking Crew on so many hits from the '60s she used a felt mute she placed over the strings to get her signature sound. You can hear it very clearly during the intro lines on the Beach Boys "Good Vibrations".
     
  16. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    I would not want anyone to believe that any of the TC bass heads would be the equal of a VT-22, V-4 or V-4B. As a bass amp I feel they lean more in that directions than others that lean towards a more open modern voicing and I have never played a guitar through my RH750.

    I did however try playing through my BG250-115 combo when I had it. The amp section of the BG250 combo and the BH250 head are much the same. It sounded about like you'd expect a guitar to sound when played through a bass amp. The sparkle and the harmonics just weren't there. Based on that experience I'd be hesitant to suggest them for guitar work.

    There are a number of V-4 guitar heads listed on Reverb which are essentially the same as a VT-22 and a couple of those listed as well. Some are priced ridiculously high much like everything else these days but all accept offers and those weigh about half as much as an SVT head. Roughly 40-45lbs.

    Long, long ago I have an SVT and not for long. As soon as I stopped playing gigs in large venues like HS gymnasiums and outdoor festivals it was gone and as great as they are I will never buy another but I would buy a V-4B head if only for nostalgia sake I ever tripped across a real bargain. I've a buddy with one.
     
  17. Old Woody

    Old Woody Active Member

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    That's the compressor I'm getting but ,as I also want a Morning Glory by JHS I'm trying to find the "Steak n Eggs" pedal which was a collaboration between JHS and Keeley that has both pedals in one. I've seen them on Reverb I just don't want to pay over $300 dollars for a used one. :(
     
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  18. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    But can you really have too many guitar pedals? ;)

    Pat
     
  19. Space1999

    Space1999 Well-Known Member

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    Yes I love Carol Kaye! And you rarely see the big metal felt bar over a Precision anymore unless its an expensive reissue. Not sure about Rickenbacker.

    But that ability to just barely touch the strings or go full contact is an intriguing one. I wonder if you can by them 3rd party.

    I am going to have to retire from playing bass with my fingers which is a bummer. But I had my right hand fused and it causes severe pain to do that work out.

    I don’t have any pain at all from picking guitar so I will just pick the bass from now on I guess.

    That is why I was asking about the felt. I have various size blocks of foam stashed for just such a situation as muting strings so I guess that is the easiest was to go.

    I have seen some guys thread a ribbon of felt through their strings as far back as they can go. But that seems like it would be unstable.

    Jaco used a basketball wrist band LOL and I have seen guys do that too. They can adjust just how much they want it to touch the strings.

    I guess I will have to experiment. I appreciate the feedback. I read what you said about the TC Head not being really suitable for guitar. I was mainly looking for that signature Ampeg sound in a clean solid state format.

    I noticed you said that you play through 12” speakers. That is very interesting. I know 70’s rock bands did that with Marshall setups. What made you go with 12” speakers for bass?

    Pat
     
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  20. soulman969

    soulman969 Well-Known Member

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    Over the years I've had speaker cabs with 10"s, 12"s, and 15"s and more of late I found that I tend to favor 12"s for the way they handle the mids and low mids. I don't like the way a 2x10" cab sounds in a larger venue and a 4x10" cab is larger and heavier than a 2x12" cab which I use now somewhat by default.

    All of the combo amps I've ever owned have had a single 15" and I wouldn't be hesitant to use a single 15" in a separate head/cab set up even now. But I've found that a 2x12" cab which can handle more power and gives me a tighter bottom end and punchier mids just works better for me and my playing style.

    When I decided to upgrade my rig a couple years ago I sold my 250w 1x15" combo in favor of going with that Epifani Neo 2x12"/4 ohm cab and the TC RH750 head. Because of how the power module works a single 15"/4 ohm cab could handle that head as well but I decided to get a second 1x12" cab instead.

    Both are 4 ohm cabs so I can run either of them individually or combine them to run 3x12" @ 2.67 ohms of impedance. While the RH750 can't handle both at 2.67 ohms the Carvin BX500 can so that gives me two heads and three possible cab configurations I can run depending on my needs plus a backup head.

    Overall it's no more than a personal preference to avoiding mixing 10"s with a 15" like I did for several years when I could bi-amp each cab. When I moved on from that rig it was to a 4x10 extended range cab that could handle my 5 string bass and an Ampeg SVT III head I now wish I'd never sold. They're scarce.

    All of that gear was sold around 15 years when I had to take a long term sabbatical from playing. Then around 2010 when I began to get back into music again I had to rebuild my gear stable and began with a Jazz Bass and that 250w 1x15 combo and I've been adding to it and upgrading my rigs ever since.
     
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