Sheeeet !

BGood

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Most of the videos don't show this, but from personal experience, I'd tape the truss rod and also lightly vaseline the outside of the tape before you do the epoxy. You might not be able to pull out all the tape once the neck's fixed, but at least it prevents the epoxy from getting all over the truss rod.
Thanks for reminding me. It being an Epiphone, the truss rod is pretty deep in the channel, so I'll just plug the opening.
 

Raiyn

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Most of the videos don't show this, but from personal experience, I'd tape the truss rod and also lightly vaseline the outside of the tape before you do the epoxy. You might not be able to pull out all the tape once the neck's fixed, but at least it prevents the epoxy from getting all over the truss rod.
twoodfrd's videos usually make a point of showing some care in this regard. Sometimes it's an application of some paste wax, sometimes he does something else.
 

BGood

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Got my scale, retrieved epoxy from under the stairs, made a small mix to test curing. It is so not a luxury to have that scale. Poured precisely 5 grams of resin, then 1 gram of hardener. Added a bit of gap filler micro fibers to augment viscosity so it doesn't run everywhere.

Premier mix epoxy + micro bulles.jpg
 

Noodling Guitars

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Got my scale, retrieved epoxy from under the stairs, made a small mix to test curing. It is so not a luxury to have that scale. Poured precisely 5 grams of resin, then 1 gram of hardener. Added a bit of gap filler micro fibers to augment viscosity so it doesn't run everywhere.

View attachment 19319
Having one of those is a must in the kitchen for baking (and coffee making) :D
 

Norton

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west epoxy and micro fibers? that will absolutely work. With splines? that thing should be future proof! 👍👍👍
 

BGood

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west epoxy and micro fibers? that will absolutely work. With splines? that thing should be future proof! 👍👍👍
Seeing how well both pieces lock together, I'm starting to wonder if the spline thing is a bit overboard.

Here's the mix
epoxy micro fibers mix.jpg
Sleeping beauty, pressure applied with wedges.
666.jpg

I just now realized that this guitar has the Number Of The Beast as a serial ! ! !
 
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Noodling Guitars

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Seeing how well both pieces lock together, I'm starting to wonder if the spline thing is a bit overboard.

I wondered about that when I did my first neck repair - though I used wood glue for that. It held up fine for a couple of years with medium play and then somewhere else (not along the glue line though) started to give. I'd be a bit worried that the areas around the epoxy would not provide sufficient strength under string tension.
 

grinwer

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If you can't remove the old adhesive, epoxy is a good solution.
On new joints, it is better to use wood glue.
If the glue is good, then it is not torn along the seam, but the tree is torn.
do you make dowels? ...How would it be in French?
 

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BGood

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I wondered about that when I did my first neck repair - though I used wood glue for that. It held up fine for a couple of years with medium play and then somewhere else (not along the glue line though) started to give. I'd be a bit worried that the areas around the epoxy would not provide sufficient strength under string tension.
I had not thought along that line. I figure that if it held quite long with a not so good job, it should last with this epoxy joint. If this repair fails, it will not be at the glued section, so I'll reglue and then put in splines.
If you can't remove the old adhesive, epoxy is a good solution.
On new joints, it is better to use wood glue.
If the glue is good, then it is not torn along the seam, but the tree is torn.
do you make dowels? ...How would it be in French?
As explained earlier, I removed (with a dentist cleaning pick) all the glue I could see. But it was evident that the wood grain stayed sealed, thus the epoxy choice.

Dowel, spline. In French: gougeon (this would be cylindrical), cheville. This too I addressed earlier. I looked at a dozen videos on it and going in there with a router would be nerve racking. If I can avoid it, I will. I'll see where I stand when the epoxy is 100% cured.
 

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I would think the epoxy you used would hold. BUT... that break is soooooooooooooo troublesome, that I'd want to put the splines in.

simply because it's all set up do that work now, and if you had to do it later? that would just be tragic.


NICE WORK!!! Dr. Bgood! love that clamping setup you've got going on.
 

BGood

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I would think the epoxy you used would hold. BUT... that break is soooooooooooooo troublesome, that I'd want to put the splines in.

simply because it's all set up do that work now, and if you had to do it later? that would just be tragic.


NICE WORK!!! Dr. Bgood! love that clamping setup you've got going on.
Necessity is the mother of invention. The clamping apparatus was actually designed to also add a chariot to guide the router.

I can twist the neck by the headstock. I think it will hold fine as it is.
It needs filling surface voids; I'll mix another tiny batch of epoxy with fairing microfibers this time. Then finishing.

Done from bottom.jpg

Done from top.jpg
 

Raiyn

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I would think the epoxy you used would hold. BUT... that break is soooooooooooooo troublesome, that I'd want to put the splines in.

simply because it's all set up do that work now, and if you had to do it later? that would just be tragic.


NICE WORK!!! Dr. Bgood! love that clamping setup you've got going on.
If I've watched enough of Mr. Woodford's channel, the real reason for the splines is so that something other than end grain (broken end grain at that) is being glued. Supposedly gluing side grain makes a superior joint and the splines are a means to that end more so than reinforcement.
 


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